Discuss Is this true? - hairline crack in one of the newly placed floor tiles in the UK Tiling Forum | Tile Advice Forum area at TilersForums.com

N

nipsjm

-
Reaction score
0
We recently had an en suite fitted by a local company that appears to be generally reputable. We've had a few issues with the work, one of which was that we noticed a hairline crack in one of the newly placed floor tiles.

The company sent someone out to replace the tile and although I didn't watch what they were doing, I can say it was loud and some kind of saw was being used, causing vibration throughout the house.

A month or so later and that same tile had begun to rock on one corner. We called them and they sent a different guy out who having gone through the same removal process advised that the previous fix had failed to use primer on the plywood substrate and as such the tile had become loose. I took a photo post removal and in addition to the tile, a square hole had been cut in the plywood layer between the tile and existing floorboards.

Roll on another few weeks and the entire floor is becoming unstable with tiles rocking all over and cracks in the grout.

The company sent someone back last week and their response is that there must be movement in our house and therefore they cannot use floor tiles and we would instead need to use some form of click-laminate. This won't match the walls (as we specifically chose the same tile) and both the materials and labour would I believe be considerably cheaper with this option.

My initial reaction and that of those I've consulted who are much more savvy on this kind of thing is that they are taking the pi$$. All houses have some level of movement and this is why a layer is used between the existing floorboards and the tile. From what I can see, they used fairly thin plywood (rather than backboard) which when combined with removing two tiles and cutting through the plywood (removing the integrity of this layer) has resulted in the issue with the other tiles, rather than there being an issue with house movement.

What do the experts think?

We have tiles in the family bathroom that have been down for years and never had a problem, though they were installed using concrete backed backboard as far as I recall. They tried to blame some building work that happened 4 years before their work, but that did not affect the structure of the house in this area and even if it had, my understanding is that the point of the ply is to reduce impact of any house movement, and the double tile removal, including the hole in the ply is more likely to be the cause of the issue.

Any thoughts or advice gratefully received.
 
Last edited:
Dave

Dave

TF
Staff member
Esteemed
Supporter
Arms
Reaction score
2,789
We recently had an en suite fitted by a local company that appears to be generally reputable. We've had a few issues with the work, one of which was that we noticed a hairline crack in one of the newly placed floor tiles.

The company sent someone out to replace the tile and although I didn't watch what they were doing, I can say it was loud and some kind of saw was being used, causing vibration throughout the house.

A month or so later and that same tile had begun to rock on one corner. We called them and they sent a different guy out who having gone through the same removal process advised that the previous fix had failed to use primer on the plywood substrate and as such the tile had become loose. I took a photo post removal and in addition to the tile, a square hole had been cut in the plywood layer between the tile and existing floorboards.

Roll on another few weeks and the entire floor is becoming unstable with tiles rocking all over and cracks in the grout.

The company sent someone back last week and their response is that there must be movement in our house and therefore they cannot use floor tiles and we would instead need to use some form of click-laminate. This won't match the walls (as we specifically chose the same tile) and both the materials and labour would I believe be considerably cheaper with this option.

My initial reaction and that of those I've consulted who are much more savvy on this kind of thing is that they are taking the pi$$. All houses have some level of movement and this is why a layer is used between the existing floorboards and the tile. From what I can see, they used fairly thin plywood (rather than backboard) which when combined with removing two tiles and cutting through the plywood (removing the integrity of this layer) has resulted in the issue with the other tiles, rather than there being an issue with house movement.

What do the experts think?

We have tiles in the family bathroom that have been down for years and never had a problem, though they were installed using concrete backed backboard as far as I recall. They tried to blame some building work that happened 4 years before their work, but that did not affect the structure of the house in this area and even if it had, my understanding is that the point of the ply is to reduce impact of any house movement, and the double tile removal, including the hole in the ply is more likely to be the cause of the issue.

Any thoughts or advice gratefully received.
They are talking utter bollox I’m afraid. They have incorrectly prepared the floor for tiling. Thin plywood is 100% unsuitable for tiling too.
 
N

nipsjm

-
Reaction score
0
They are talking utter bollox I’m afraid. They have incorrectly prepared the floor for tiling. Thin plywood is 100% unsuitable for tiling too.
Thanks. Are there any specific standards I can refer to if I need to make a case for small claims? If not, I guess I could get an expert opinion from another tiler?
 
N

nipsjm

-
Reaction score
0
Bs5385 , not sure on the exact section but if you phone the tile association tech line they will advise
Thanks again. One last question. I stated that the plywood used is too thin, which is clearly subjective. What would be a reasonable thickness, or is plywood just not suitable for a bathroom floor?
 
Dave

Dave

TF
Staff member
Esteemed
Supporter
Arms
Reaction score
2,789
Thanks again. One last question. I stated that the plywood used is too thin, which is clearly subjective. What would be a reasonable thickness, or is plywood just not suitable for a bathroom floor?
Standards say that 15mm is minimum but to he honest since tiling to plywood on walls was abolished under changes to bs5385 , then not many tilers tile to plywood at all and definitely not as thin as yours is. Yours is simply incorrect prep work and not house movement
 
Lou

Lou

Admin
Staff member
Esteemed
Reaction score
841
Let us know if you get any joy with the company!
 
Dan

Dan

Admin
Staff member
Reaction score
6,108
You needed a tile backer board or just reboarding with plasterboard fixed with mechanical fixings (so screws and plasterboard adhesive to battens that are solid plumb and true).

Gutted to hear about this.
 

Reply to Is this true? - hairline crack in one of the newly placed floor tiles in the UK Tiling Forum | Tile Advice Forum area at TilersForums.com

Top