Discuss Porcelain cutting tool options for beginner in the Tiling Tools area at TilersForums.com

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Hi, apologies if this has already been covered before but I couldn't find anything in the forum searches.

ok so I'm an aerospace engineer by trade and carpenter by hobby, so I'm pretty capable at making things and have set my hand to refurbishing my en suite into a wet room. the plumbing, electrics and wedi board waterproofing has all been completed and successfully tested and now I'm ready for tiling.

I'll be using Mandarin Stone Hendre creme 10mm thick 1200x600 porcelain tiles. I've previously used these for a floor in my sunroom and they went down well, I used a continuous edge diamond blade in my 9inch angle grinder and they cut well although the edges were chipped and rough (all hidden under the wall/skirtings).
I'll also be using some split face slate which will need cutting square on the edges.

for this project I'm needing a bit more accuracy as I cannot hide the edges so easily so I'm looking at a tracked/guided solution. all straight cuts and only about 10m in total cut length.
I'm also able to use my glass cutting table with sacrificial cover so will have good support and a slight shock absorption.

Options I've thought of.
Festool TS75 tracks with a continuous rim diamond blade (ATS or similar). I realise this isn't ideal for the saw due to the shock levels and dust potentially getting past the seals, but its only 10m in total. I understand the cut direction is also not ideal so I was thinking I could do a backwards score cut for the first pass and minimise any chipping.

A small 4inch angle grinder with thin blade and just follow a straight edge as best I can.

the Festool DCS with a suitable thin porcelain blade. as much as I'd love to add to my festool collection for only 10m it seems like overkill.

A wall chaser with a single thin porcelain blade. this seems like it's basically the same as the festool DCS but much cheaper unless I'm missing something? I could easily adapt it to run along a track. has anyone ever tried this?

Hire a large wetsaw. obviously a good option, but I was looking to take my time so the cost would mount up.

a score and break type tile cutter. but it seems like the risk of tile breakage is higher with these than a saw type? I also need to do a couple of partial cuts around the linear drain so I'll still need something else.

for the split face slate I'm thinking a small wet disc cutter will be fine as its only small pieces.

thoughts and advice would be much appreciated :)
 
Cherie

Cherie

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I bought a portable wet tile saw it was only around $50 or $60. Others have borrowed it and liked it. Of course I haven't used it yet. Not at that stage right now. Which is why they feel free to borrow. Lol
 

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Kevbos

Kevbos

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Hi, apologies if this has already been covered before but I couldn't find anything in the forum searches.

ok so I'm an aerospace engineer by trade and carpenter by hobby, so I'm pretty capable at making things and have set my hand to refurbishing my en suite into a wet room. the plumbing, electrics and wedi board waterproofing has all been completed and successfully tested and now I'm ready for tiling.

I'll be using Mandarin Stone Hendre creme 10mm thick 1200x600 porcelain tiles. I've previously used these for a floor in my sunroom and they went down well, I used a continuous edge diamond blade in my 9inch angle grinder and they cut well although the edges were chipped and rough (all hidden under the wall/skirtings).
I'll also be using some split face slate which will need cutting square on the edges.

for this project I'm needing a bit more accuracy as I cannot hide the edges so easily so I'm looking at a tracked/guided solution. all straight cuts and only about 10m in total cut length.
I'm also able to use my glass cutting table with sacrificial cover so will have good support and a slight shock absorption.

Options I've thought of.
Festool TS75 tracks with a continuous rim diamond blade (ATS or similar). I realise this isn't ideal for the saw due to the shock levels and dust potentially getting past the seals, but its only 10m in total. I understand the cut direction is also not ideal so I was thinking I could do a backwards score cut for the first pass and minimise any chipping.

A small 4inch angle grinder with thin blade and just follow a straight edge as best I can.

the Festool DCS with a suitable thin porcelain blade. as much as I'd love to add to my festool collection for only 10m it seems like overkill.

A wall chaser with a single thin porcelain blade. this seems like it's basically the same as the festool DCS but much cheaper unless I'm missing something? I could easily adapt it to run along a track. has anyone ever tried this?

Hire a large wetsaw. obviously a good option, but I was looking to take my time so the cost would mount up.

a score and break type tile cutter. but it seems like the risk of tile breakage is higher with these than a saw type? I also need to do a couple of partial cuts around the linear drain so I'll still need something else.

for the split face slate I'm thinking a small wet disc cutter will be fine as its only small pieces.

thoughts and advice would be much appreciated :)
Toolstation !spectrum porcelain blade for angle grinder !hold sponge wet against wheel as it cuts !! Perfect cut no chips !!shhhhhh health and safety against it !!
 
R
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Probably a bit late now for this op , but I bought one of these for straight cuts in porcelain . It uses a water feed from hose and cuts well , with minimal chipping especially if you make two passes ..... one to get through the glaze ( 3mm) and then the second to cut through . I clamped on a straight edge , to run the base plate against and used a continuous blade not the one pictured here . Small chips didn't matter in my case , but I chamfered one cut slightly with a rubbing stone and was surprised to get it very close to a finished edge .
 

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