Discuss Need advice on waterproofing 3 bathrooms - seems a bad job in the UK Tiling Forum | Tile Advice Forum area at TilersForums.com

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renov1

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We are in the process of renovating our 3 bathrooms. One wet room (walk-in shower), one with a bath, and one with a shower tray. They have done the job whilst we were away on holiday and when we returned, two of the bathrooms were tiled and grouted, the third one wasn't grouted so we were able to see the wall in between the tiles...

I am seriously concerned about the waterproofing my builder has done/ is currently doing and would need some expert advice from you guys.
For the 3 bathrooms, they have removed the old tiles and underneath, there is brickwork with some patches of orange plaster and some cement. It was really uneven, with little grooves, etc. They seem to have tiled straight onto this substrate. Applied the tile adhesive without any waterpoofing paint/coat. (and of course no board)
None of the walls around the walk-in shower, around the shower tray and above the bath have been prepared, they have not been re-plastered / made smooth,
The tiler and builder assure me that we don't need to waterproof the walls. which concerns me as I read everywhere that we should tank the room, ideally with boards or with a waterproof membrane or coat.
The tiler says that the grout is waterproof and water won't going behind the tiles. which is, I'm sure, incorrect, as over time, buildings move and this creates little cracks in the grout etc...

For the walk-in shower, the first tiler who did the job admitted he didn't waterproof the junctions (corners between walls and junctions between wall/floor/bench) with a waterproofing and anti-fracture membrane (Kerdi-kereck or Mapeguard type). So our builder ripped out the entire newly done bathroom and is now re-doing it (with a new tiler).
Now, the wall (initially the brickwork with some uneven plaster/cement on it) has a really thick (1.5cm) layer of tile adhesive. that the tiler doesn't want to remove (he's telling that "it will be a perfect surface to add the new tiles on this". Really?). This time, they are planning to add a coat of a waterproofing liquid on this. But I'm wondering how can you apply a waterproof coat on a wall that has so many "bumps and grooves".. am I wrong?

I would be grateful if you could please let me know your thoughts on this.

1. should they waterproof the walls around a shower, and above a bath?
2. should they waterproof the walls under the bath?
3. should they waterproof the floor under the bath?
4. should they plaster the walls to make it smooth (before applying a waterproofing liquid)?
5. if they use a waterproofing liquid, do they need to use a primer before?
6. In the shower and above the bath, should they put a waterproof board or membrane (instead of a waterproofing liquid)?
7. In the walk-in shower (which they are currently re-doing..), should they remove the dried tile adhesive, to make the wall surface flat and smooth, before applying the waterproofing liquid?
8. Or should they tank this wet room with waterproof boards (instead of using a waterproofing liquid)?

I need proof from other tilers to convince my builder...

Many thanks for your help

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Solution
A
Ill help as much as my limited knowledge permits, a problem you have is there are regulations and standards the latter do not really have to be adhered to, and a lot of so called tilers don't bother unfortunately.

My answers are my own opinion and if not necessarily regulation but just my opinion/standard ...

1. should they waterproof the walls around a shower, and above a bath? - Yes, if there is a shower above the bath then I would normally tank this area.
2. should they waterproof the walls under the bath? - Not really, if the bath is fitted correctly then no water should get under the bath through the bath/wall transition.
3. should they waterproof the floor under the bath? - Not unless...
A
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Ill help as much as my limited knowledge permits, a problem you have is there are regulations and standards the latter do not really have to be adhered to, and a lot of so called tilers don't bother unfortunately.

My answers are my own opinion and if not necessarily regulation but just my opinion/standard ...

1. should they waterproof the walls around a shower, and above a bath? - Yes, if there is a shower above the bath then I would normally tank this area.
2. should they waterproof the walls under the bath? - Not really, if the bath is fitted correctly then no water should get under the bath through the bath/wall transition.
3. should they waterproof the floor under the bath? - Not unless specified as the above info kind of applies the same
4. should they plaster the walls to make it smooth (before applying a waterproofing liquid)? - If you plaster the walls before tiling then really you should leave approx 7-10 days for the plaster to cure before tanking and tiling.
5. if they use a waterproofing liquid, do they need to use a primer before? - Follow the tanking manufacturers instructions
6. In the shower and above the bath, should they put a waterproof board or membrane (instead of a waterproofing liquid)? - A correctly applied tanking liquid would suffice.
7. In the walk-in shower (which they are currently re-doing..), should they remove the dried tile adhesive, to make the wall surface flat and smooth, before applying the waterproofing liquid? - I would think it would preferably be removed but again speak to the manufacturer as they be best to advise if it can be applied over adhesive. I would be inclined to question as to why the tiles came off so easily as generally you would back butter the tiles and whenever ive tried to remove a tile which has been installed correctly it basically rips the wall to bits, yours seems to have come off easily from what I can see on the picture.
8. Or should they tank this wet room with waterproof boards (instead of using a waterproofing liquid)? - A wet room in my opinion needs to be constructed of backer boards like wedi or kerdi etc in the wet area i.e. shower and floor, the other walls in the room could possibly just be tanked.

I hope the above information helps somewhat in getting your issues resolved.
 
Solution
Kevbos

Kevbos

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We are in the process of renovating our 3 bathrooms. One wet room (walk-in shower), one with a bath, and one with a shower tray. They have done the job whilst we were away on holiday and when we returned, two of the bathrooms were tiled and grouted, the third one wasn't grouted so we were able to see the wall in between the tiles...

I am seriously concerned about the waterproofing my builder has done/ is currently doing and would need some expert advice from you guys.
For the 3 bathrooms, they have removed the old tiles and underneath, there is brickwork with some patches of orange plaster and some cement. It was really uneven, with little grooves, etc. They seem to have tiled straight onto this substrate. Applied the tile adhesive without any waterpoofing paint/coat. (and of course no board)
None of the walls around the walk-in shower, around the shower tray and above the bath have been prepared, they have not been re-plastered / made smooth,
The tiler and builder assure me that we don't need to waterproof the walls. which concerns me as I read everywhere that we should tank the room, ideally with boards or with a waterproof membrane or coat.
The tiler says that the grout is waterproof and water won't going behind the tiles. which is, I'm sure, incorrect, as over time, buildings move and this creates little cracks in the grout etc...

For the walk-in shower, the first tiler who did the job admitted he didn't waterproof the junctions (corners between walls and junctions between wall/floor/bench) with a waterproofing and anti-fracture membrane (Kerdi-kereck or Mapeguard type). So our builder ripped out the entire newly done bathroom and is now re-doing it (with a new tiler).
Now, the wall (initially the brickwork with some uneven plaster/cement on it) has a really thick (1.5cm) layer of tile adhesive. that the tiler doesn't want to remove (he's telling that "it will be a perfect surface to add the new tiles on this". Really?). This time, they are planning to add a coat of a waterproofing liquid on this. But I'm wondering how can you apply a waterproof coat on a wall that has so many "bumps and grooves".. am I wrong?

I would be grateful if you could please let me know your thoughts on this.

1. should they waterproof the walls around a shower, and above a bath?
2. should they waterproof the walls under the bath?
3. should they waterproof the floor under the bath?
4. should they plaster the walls to make it smooth (before applying a waterproofing liquid)?
5. if they use a waterproofing liquid, do they need to use a primer before?
6. In the shower and above the bath, should they put a waterproof board or membrane (instead of a waterproofing liquid)?
7. In the walk-in shower (which they are currently re-doing..), should they remove the dried tile adhesive, to make the wall surface flat and smooth, before applying the waterproofing liquid?
8. Or should they tank this wet room with waterproof boards (instead of using a waterproofing liquid)?

I need proof from other tilers to convince my builder...

Many thanks for your help

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Did you ask for waterproofed wetrooms and is that in qoutes you and tradesman agreed on before commencement of works ?? And do you or tradespeople really know how to create a wetroom that will actually work ?? Because there is no point tanking everywhere if you have pipes etc all coming through walls , or just doing certain areas !!
 

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